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AP/Advanced English Literature Part 1
LI.ENG.403010.1.PE
Course Length: 1 Semester
Has Textbook: Yes
AP/Advanced English Literature is an accelerated course meant to prepare students who plan to take the Advanced Placement exam. This course meets the Advanced Placement criteria required by the College Board. In this course, students will write extensively and will apply their writing knowledge in creating several types of critical analyses, including biographical, historical, mythological, psychological, and formalist analyses. Students will also read challenging literary selections ranging from classical to modern times, such as Robert Browning's "My Last Duchess" and Kurt Vonnegut, Jr.'s "Harrison Bergeron." In this section of AP/Advanced English Literature, students will review works across the genres of short fiction and poetry. Following a rigorous semester timeline, students will also review and practice skills, techniques, and procedures to prepare them for the Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition Exam. Some of the literary works used in this course involve mature themes.
Successful completion of both Part 1 and Part 2 of this course is required for students to earn the AP designation.


Course Objectives

Unit 1: Essential Content and Skills

  • Examine the aspect of actively participating in reading a story.
  • Recognize the importance of using background information for analyzing a text.
  • Interpret the meaning of formalist theory in the context of literary criticism.
  • Interpret the meaning of biographical theory in the context of literary criticism.
  • Interpret the meaning of historical theory in the context of literary criticism.
  • Distinguish the differences between historical criticism and New Historicism.
  • Interpret the meaning of mythological theory in the context of literary criticism.

 Unit 2: Essential Content and Skills

  • Interpret the meaning of sociological theory in the context of literary criticism.
  • Compare and contrast gender-based criticism and feminist criticism.
  • Recognize the viewpoint of a reader-response theorist.
  • Examine deconstructionist works and the steps needed to create a deconstructionist criticism.
  • Interpret the meaning of cultural studies in the context of literary criticism.
  • Assemble other analyses by demonstrating independent research skills.

Unit 3: Essential Content and Skills

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the concept of using the genre of poetry in literary criticism.
  • Examine the aspect of actively participating in reading a poem.
  • Examine the voice used in dramatic poetry.
  • Appraise information about writing effectively to assist in the writing process.
  • Practice listening to a voice while reading poetry.
  • Recognize the importance of imagery in poetry.
  • Determine the differences between contemporary haiku poems and traditional Japanese haiku poems.

Unit 4: Essential Content and Skills

  • Analyze the different types of formal patterns in poetry.
  • Appraise information about writing effectively to assist in the writing process.
  • Examine the elements used in open forms of poetry.
  • Differentiate between prose poetry and prose.
  • Interpret the meaning in visual poetry.
  • Review the use of archetypes in literature, especially in poetry.
  • Examine the practice of bringing myth into the modern age of popular culture.

Course Materials

  • An Introduction to Fiction, Poetry, Drama, and Writing (textbook)

**NCAA approved